Comms InfoZone Categories


Latest Comms InfoZone Articles

Network/Ethernet Switches

Network/Ethernet Switches

Ethernet switches physically connect devices on a computer network. They regulate data flow through the network by performing packet switching. A network switch will only broadcast a message to the device that requests or needs it. Each device

View Article

802.3az

The network standard 802.3az was developed by the IEEE with the goal of reducing network power usage when demands fall. IEEE 802.3az defines enhancements to twisted pair cabling that can result in significantly lower network energy consumption,

View Article

802.3ad

The IEEE standard 802.3ad defines the use of multiple transmission paths between network devices with the objective of potentially increasing Ethernet speeds. The practice of establishing a wider transmission path is commonly known as link

View Article

802.1x

The IEEE authentication standard 802.1X supports improved security over wireless local area networks (WLANs). 802.1x enhances security measures through a process of user and system authentications. The standard is based on the EAP encapsulation

View Article

802.1Q

The open IEEE standard 802.1Q supports the quality of service (QoS) and Virtual LAN (VLAN) identification as traffic moves over an Ethernet network. A VLAN is a local area network that utilises another LAN, rather than its own physical network,

View Article

802.1P

The 802.1p method is a Quality of Service (QoS) process defined within the IEEE 802.1Q standard. The technique uses a three-bit field within an Ethernet frame header to assign priority levels to packets moving within a network segment. With

View Article

802.1d

802.1D is the IEEE Media Access Control (MAC) Bridges standard which includes the Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and Bridging. It details linking to other 802 projects, including the Ethernet and Wi-Fi standards. The Spanning Tree Protocol (STP)

View Article

802.11n

The IEEE 802.11n standard was developed to deliver improved data rates and ranges for Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs). The standard was released as a successor to 802.11g. It offers improvements in network bandwidth through the “multiple

View Article

802.11i

The IEEE 802.11i is an amendment to the 802.11 standard. 802.11i supports data communications security for Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs). This amendment defines processes for wireless authentication, key management, and packet encryption.

View Article

802.11g

The 802.11g is a standard for Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) and an extension to the 802.11 specification. 802.11g was developed by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) for WLAN as an improvement over its predecessor,

View Article
HTTPS encryption

HTTPS encryption

HTTPS encryption is the protocol for secure communications over a network. HTTPS stands for Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure. It is a widely utilised tool over the Internet. HTTPS differs from HTTP in that data is encrypted with the Secure

View Article